Shiny pieces in chocolate money chest reveal uniquely labeled treasure

While hiking with a metal detector, a Norwegian man found a treasure called ‘The Discovery of the Century’. The treasure has caused great excitement in Norway, experts say the coins found are ‘unique’.

CHOCOLATE TITLED ONE OF THE COINS

Hiking in a field in Rennesoey, near Stavanger, in late August, Bore was on his way home when his metal detector started beeping. When he saw the shiny object stuck in the detector, he thought it was one of the chocolate coins at first, but when he started digging, he couldn’t believe his eyes. When he dug a little further, he found nine necklaces, three rings, and 10 more gold pearls, and decided to call the archaeologists. Explaining that he wanted to be an archaeologist when he was little, Bore said the discovery was “unreal” for him.

FROM VERY OLD TIMES

The jewels, weighing just over 100 grams, were found to date from 500 AD. Some of these dated back to the fall of the Roman Empire. Associate Professor Hakon Reiersen of the University of Stavanger’s Museum of Archaeology said the flat, thin, one-sided gold medallions date from around 500 AD.

HE WAS CARRYING HIGH-LEVEL NAMES

This suggests that the treasure dates from a period in Norway called the ‘Migration Period’, marked by large-scale migrations that led to the final collapse of the Western Roman Empire in 476 AD. Reiersen said the pendants and gold pearls were made by talented jewelers of the time and were worn only by high-level powerful people.

IT IS DESCRIBED AS “UNIQUE”

Stating that no similar discovery has been made in Norway since the 19th century, Reiersen added that this is a very unusual discovery. Archaeologists say that the medallions found were unique due to the design on them.

Prof Sigmund Oehrl, who works at the museum, said in a statement about the medallions, “In the design, the Scandinavian god Odin treats his son’s sick horse. In Scandinavian mythology, the horse symbol represented illness and distress, but also healing and hope for new life.”

WILL RECEIVE AWARD

Under Norwegian law, objects from before 1537 and coins older than 1650 are considered state property and must be handed over to the authorities when found.

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